Topic Archive

Joy

Agility

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Motherhood and Thriving: Navigating with Grace

What serves to ground, connect, and direct towards joy? Dr. Pam King asks this question as a guide for Mothers and others.

Joy

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We Really Can’t Do it All: Destigmatizing Human Limitations to Reclaim Joy

Reclaim joy through examining the rhythms of your life. A series of questions will help you explore.

Joy

News

Unwrapping the Science of Joy

The story "Unwrapping the Science of Joy" is now published in Templeton Ideas!

Joy

Research Project

The Joyride Project

This project seeks to integrate the theological and psychological perspectives of joy and flourishing.

Joy

Video

Cultivating Our Capacity for Joy

How can we cultivate our joy “muscles?” Pamela Ebstyne King, executive director at the Thrive Center, speaks on what is required for our joy training and the benefits of joy at the 2018 Future of Joy Conference, hosted by the Yale Center for Faith and Culture. Author’s Note This talk was given at the Yale Center for Faith and Culture.

Joy

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Dreaming Again

This article is from the Peer Magazine issued in September, 2021.

Emotions

People holding hands

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Moral Elevation (Part 2): Practices for Elevating Ourselves and Our World

Postdoctoral Researcher, Dr. Susan Mangan provides research-based activities to help us experience the positive emotion of elevation.

Emotions

Person jumping over the hill

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Moral Elevation (Part 1): The Snowball Effect of Small Inspirations

Dr. Susan Mangan explains the role and benefits of moral elevation in inspiring us to help our communities.

Joy

Research Link

Joy as a Virtue: The Means and Ends of Joy

Abstract: To grasp human flourishing and thriving, we must understand joy. However, no theoretical models explain the complexity of joy as a fruit of the Spirit, nor fully account for its impact on human life. We suggest that joy is best conceptualized as a virtue, a psychological habit, comprised of characteristic adaptations and given meaning by transcendent narrative identity. Thus joy involves knowing, feeling, and enacting what matters most. Developmental science and Christian theological approaches to teleology inform the ultimate ends to which joy is aimed. They suggest that telos, the purpose or goal of development, may be understood as a...

Joy

Research Link

Vocation as becoming: Telos, thriving and joy

Author: Pamela Ebstyne King (Page 185-210) Abstract: This volume represents one set of reflections on issues of vocation, formation, and theological education in the first quarter of the twenty-first century. Each of the contributors to the volume is (or was, in one case) a faculty member at Fuller Theological Seminary, an institution that, like many others, has been wrestling seriously with the global transformation of theological education for at least the past decade. With the generous support of Fuller’s Office of Vocation and Formation, the editors of this volume–all of whom at the time of the project’s origins directed the...

Joy

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Dad Jokes: Science Agrees we Need More Laughter

Research shows that humor can ease stress during hard times. Dr. Susan Mangan shares 3 evidence-based practices to help us get started.